CarCostCanada

Porsche retained value tops all rivals in Canadian Black Book

2021 Porsche 911 Cabriolet
The 911 has earned highest retained value in its Premium Sporty Car segment for two years running.

No matter whether on the road or at the track, Porsche makes a habit of performing at the front of the pack. After the sports car brand managed to attain the highest position possible in the Canadian Black Book (CBB) “2021 Overall Brand Award – Luxury” category for three consecutive years, it once again achieved the top spot in the latest 2021 study.

Porsche actually scores well in all of its categories, with the Panamera retaining the highest percentage of any competitor in its Prestige Luxury Car segment, a feat it’s attained for the past eight years. Similarly, the Macan, which earned the highest score in its Compact Luxury Crossover division yet again, has owned this position for three years in a row, while the legendary 911 has been on top of the Premium Sporty Car class for two years as of the 2021 CBB study.

2021 Porsche Panamera GTS
The Panamera, shown here in 2021 GTS trim, has won its Prestige Luxury Car class for eight years in a row.

“We are honoured and delighted to accept the Overall Brand Award – Luxury as well as three model accolades from Canadian Black Book this year,” noted Marc Ouayoun, President and CEO, Porsche Cars Canada, Ltd. “Consumers have many available choices in the market and we welcome these recognitions, which provide an additional reason to consider the brand. These outstanding acknowledgments by the leading authority highlight strong value retentions which ultimately benefit the customer.”

The Canadian Black Book study ranks vehicles on the retained percentage of their manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) after four years. Holding on to a high value means that ownership will cost less when it comes time for reselling or trading in for a new model, so this is a very important metric.

2021 Porsche Macan GTS
The Macan, pictured in GTS trim, has outranked all Compact Luxury Crossover category rivals in retained value for three years consecutively.

To find out more on the latest Panamera, Macan and 911, which are currently being offered with factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent, see our 2021 Porsche Panamera Canada Prices page, our 2021 Porsche Macan Canada Prices page, and our 2022 and 2021 Porsche 911 Canada Prices pages, where you can get the latest pricing info along with the various trims and options, plus you can learn about available manufacturer rebates and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands.

Make sure to find out how a CarCostCanada membership can benefit you when purchasing your next new vehicle, and remember to download our free app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store so you can have all of this info and more available whenever you need it.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Bill Nye The Science Guy explains Porsche Taycan technology in a new video series

Bill Nye The Science Guy explains Porsche Taycan technology
Porsche commissioned Bill Nye The Science Guy to explain complicated Porsche Taycan technology in simple, everyday terms.

The new Porsche Taycan is one of the more technologically advanced EVs currently available, but this doesn’t mean the only people capable of understanding how it works are electrical engineers.

In order to simplify the science, Porsche hired Bill Nye The Science Guy, a popular TV personality, to explain all the key technology, which resulted in a five-part short-format video series. Each episode, which span just under a single minute to one-and-a-half minutes long, focus in on technologies that differentiate the Taycan from its competitors, such as its 800-volt battery, uniquely innovative aerodynamic design, regenerative braking system, two-speed transmission, and repeatable performance.

Bill Nye The Science Guy explains Porsche Taycan technology
Bill Nye uses graphics and humour to bring electrical engineering to the masses.

The YouTube series, dubbed “Bill Nye Explains The All-Electric Taycan,” was filmed at the Porsche Experience Center in Los Angeles, California. The entertaining host uses simple terms and silly antics to clarify otherwise complicated subject matter, resulting in a series that’s ideal for all ages.

The Taycan, which arrived on the electric scene only last year, is already available in two unique body unique styles and four individual trims, including 4, 4S, Turbo and Turbo S. The sleek Taycan four-door coupe can be had in three of the just-noted trims, including 4S, Turbo and Turbo S, whereas the more recently introduced Taycan Cross Turismo also has a base trim. Additionally, the Cross Turismo can be upgraded with an Off-road Design package that increases ride height while adding more aggressive styling enhancements.

Bill Nye The Science Guy explains Porsche Taycan technology
Check out all five short-format videos below.

Top-level Taycan Turbo S trim can accelerate from zero to 100 km/h in only 2.8 seconds, thanks to its 750-hp twin-electric-motor power unit, while standard AWD means that all four performance tires grip the road below, especially helpful in inclement weather or when off-road.

Porsche is now offering the 2021 Taycan with factory leasing and financing rates from zero-percent, so be sure check out our 2021 Porsche Taycan Canada Prices page to learn more. We also provide our CarCostCanada members with dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when purchasing your next new vehicle, so learn how our system works, and remember to download our free CarCostCanada app from the Apple Store or Google Play Store, so you can have all of this valuable information at your fingertips when you need it most.

Here are the five “Bill Nye Explains The All-Electric Taycan” videos:

Bill Nye Explains the All-Electric Taycan: Two-Speed Transmission (1:11):

Bill Nye Explains the All-Electric Taycan: 800 Volts (1:17):

Bill Nye Explains the All-Electric Taycan: Regenerative Braking (0:52):

Bill Nye Explains the All-Electric Taycan: Aerodynamics (1:14):

Bill Nye Explains the All-Electric Taycan: Repeat Performance (1:34):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche releases digital and physical second-generation Macan EV prototypes

2023 Porsche Macan EV Prototype
The first all-electric Macan prototypes leave Porsche’s development centre in Weissach, sporting camouflage in order to disguise their second-generation styling.

Porsche’s new Taycan is doing a great job of scooping up premium EV buyers, enough so that Tesla may want to consider redesigning its Model S sometime soon. Of course, the iconic California-turned-Texan electric carmaker isn’t likely worried, thanks to a market cap that rivals the largest tech giants, not to mention key models in all of the most important luxury segments, but at least Porsche is succeeding where many others are struggling to gain ground.

Tesla’s Model Y fills the compact luxury SUV hole in its expanding lineup, exactly where Porsche plans to directly compete with an electrified version of its already popular Macan crossover. In order to make sure the Macan EV finds as many buyers possible, Porsche is getting busy testing it on road and track, and recently released some photos and info to let us know how the process is going.

Porsche plans a 2023 launch for its upcoming all-electric Macan, which should be enough time to get the kinks out. To that end, the Stuttgart-based luxury brand had been digitally and physically testing it on its Weissach Development Centre proving grounds until recently, but now has it touring public roads in heavily camouflaged attire, so as to hide its second-generation Macan sheet metal.

“Testing in a real-life environment is now getting underway – one of the most important milestones in the development process,” commented Michael Steiner, Member of the Executive Board, Research and Development, at Porsche AG.

2023 Porsche Macan EV Prototype
Michael Steiner, Member of Porsche’s Executive Board, Research and Development, shows off a couple of camouflaged Macan EV prototypes.

Porsche plans to cover three million kilometres worldwide, in every possible type of condition, ahead of delivering fully electric Macans to market, and that lofty number doesn’t even include the “countless” virtual kilometres accumulated on the Weissach test track, not to mention many more miles achieved via digital prototypes.

According to Porsche, developing the new Macan EV digitally reduces capital expenditures and time, while it also minimizes the new model’s environmental impact. Rather than putting actual prototypes through their paces, a digital computational model replicates the kinds of true-to-life properties, systems and power units of the EV to a very high degree of accuracy. As part of the electrified Macan’s development, Porsche has utilized 20 digital prototypes in order to simulate all types of situations, resulting in critically important aerodynamic, energy management, operation, and acoustic data.

“We regularly collate the data from the various departments and use it to build up a complete, virtual vehicle that is as detailed as possible,” said Andreas Huber, manager for digital prototypes at Porsche, plus one of the first aerodynamics engineers to ever work with digital prototypes. “This allows previously undiscovered design conflicts to be swiftly identified and resolved.”

Reducing aerodynamic drag helps the Macan EV achieve its ultimate range targets, with even minimal flow enhancements making a significant difference.

2023 Porsche Macan EV Prototype
This “seat box” was used to recreate the all-electric Macan’s driving environment.

“We started with a flow-around model when the project first started about four years ago,” added Thomas Wiegand, Director of aerodynamics development.

A team of Porsche engineers utilizes simulations so as to fine-tune each and every surface of the new crossover EV, with specific attention paid to cooling air ducts. Such calculations help the engineers arrange components that in-turn optimize efficiencies, while they also provide the required data for predicting variances in real-world temperature levels. Porsche actually claims the new testing procedures allow for extremely precise simulations of both aerodynamics and thermodynamics.

“The digital world is indispensable to the development of the all-electric Macan,” said Wiegand.

Returning to air ducts and cooling, the new EV’s motive electric system boasts a totally different cooling and temperature control concept than the conventionally-powered internal combustion engine (ICE) powered Macan. To be clear, the various ICE’s used in today’s Macan need a 90- to 120-degree (Celsius) temperature operating range, whereas the new electric-powered model’s drive system and high-voltage battery maintain a temperature window between 20 and 70 degrees.

Also unique to the electric Macan, where an ICE increases its temperature when starting and stopping during heavy traffic, the battery-powered version needs more cooling during high-power charging, particularly in warmer weather. Porsche is overcoming this challenge by calculating and digitally optimizing the “position, flow and temperature” via the digital prototypes mentioned earlier.

2023 Porsche Macan EV Prototype
Porsche made some of the early physical prototypes of the Macan EV by hand.

Digital prototype use can start quite early in any vehicle’s developmental stage. In fact, Porsche created a completely new driver interface for its upcoming second-gen Macan long before designing some of the other components. A revised driver display was included, of course, which, when ready for testing, Porsche brought to life in a “seat box” that was capable of simulating the actual driving environment.

“Simulation allows us to assess displays, operating procedures and the changing influences during a journey from the driver’s point of view,” said Fabian Klausmann of Porsche’s Driver Experience development department. “Here, the ‘test drivers’ are not just the specialists themselves but also non-experts. This allows all interaction between driver and vehicle to be studied down to the last detail, enabling selective optimization even before the first physical cockpit has been built.”

The initial physical Macan EV prototypes were developed from information learned through the digital prototype program, and once these running prototypes were on the track, they fed additional data back to the digital prototypes to continue testing with. This process allowed Porsche’s engineers to continually update both the digital and physical prototypes, refining each aspect of the Macan EV throughout the development process.

“Endurance testing on closed-off testing facilities and public roads in real-life conditions is still indispensable to ensure that the vehicle structure, operational stability and reliability of hardware, software and all functions meet our high-quality standards,” continued Steiner.

2023 Porsche Macan EV Prototype
After the digital development of the new Macan EV, Porsche started running laps around its Weissach development centre test track.

The Macan EV continues to undergo a demanding testing process, including climate extreme endurance tests, plus the need to overcome all types of topographical conditions. Of course, this would include real-world charging and conditioning of the new EV’s high-voltage battery, with everyday reliability and segment-leading performance being high on the agenda.

“Like the Taycan, the all-electric Macan, with its 800-volt architecture, will offer typical Porsche E-Performance,” added Steiner, pointing to development goals such as the SUV’s long-distance range, high-performance fast charging, and goal of best-in-segment performance. “The all-electric Macan will be the sportiest model in its segment.”

The new Macan EV will also need to be highly efficient, of course, which is why it’s the first Porsche to make use of the brand’s new Premium Platform Electric (PPE) architecture. This said, most Macan owners will continue choosing one of the automaker’s conventional ICE’s instead of the electrical alternative, at least in its early years, particularly in markets where consumers aren’t penalized for not going green, thus gasoline-powered models will need to remain part of the overall Macan package for the unforeseen future.

“In Europe, demand for electric vehicles continues to rise, but the pace of change varies considerably across the world,” noted Steiner. “That’s why we’re going to launch another attractive conventionally-powered successor to the current Macan in the course of 2021.”

2023 Porsche Macan EV Prototype
Porsche utilized digital Macan EV prototypes to create and refine the physical prototypes, before using data derived from the latter to improve digital prototype development.

This said, the new second-generation Macan will launch later this year, with varied availability of ICE’s. The new Macan EV will follow in about three years and millions of kilometers of digital and physical prototype tests.

Until then, today’s 2021 Macan is available from $57,800, and can be had with factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent. Be sure to check out each and every available trim in our 2021 Porsche Macan Canada Prices page, and configure those you’re most interested in with all options and colours, and then find out how you can save when purchasing your new Macan (or any other new vehicle) by becoming a CarCostCanada member. Currently, Macan buyers are saving an average of $2,750 thanks to dealer invoice pricing, which is information you can now have on hand after downloading the free CarCostCanada app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store.

Story credit: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche best in JD Power CSI after earning most “trouble-free” premium brand honours

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster 25 Years
Porsche once again earned top spot in J.D. Power’s Customer Service Index (CSI).

It shouldn’t be a shock that Porsche once again earned highest honours amongst luxury brands in J.D. Power 2021 Customer Service Index (CSI) Study. This is the second time in three years the Stuttgart-based automaker took top spot amongst its premium competitors, and this only a month since winning “most trouble-free new car overall” status for its 911 sports car, in the same third-party analytics firm’s 2021 Vehicle Dependability Study (VDS), the large owners survey resulting in Porsche’s Macan (top photo) achieving the highest podium for its “Premium Compact SUV” category.

2021 Porsche 911 Carrera S
The 911 was the luxury sector’s highest ranking vehicle in J.D. Power’s 2021 Vehicle Dependability Study (VDS).

“Our dealers worked hard for our customers throughout the initial lockdowns of the past year and subsequent social distancing and health measures to make sure they could rely on Porsche,” stated Kjell Gruner, President and CEO of Porsche Cars North America, Inc. (PCNA). “We are continually striving to not just meet, but exceed the high expectations of our customers – and it’s vital that the quality of service must live up to that vision.”

2021 Porsche Cayenne E-Hybrid Coupe
The regular Cayenne was joined by this Cayenne Coupe in recent years, shown here with its fuel-efficient E-Hybrid drivetrain.

J.D. Power’s CSI Study measures “customer satisfaction with service for maintenance or repair work among owners and lessees of 1- to 3-year-old vehicles,” states a press release, with its latest data collection period being from July through December of 2020. Over 62,500 new vehicle owners responded to a survey, which allowed for a comprehensive list to pull results from.

Porsche received 17 more points over the 2000 CSI study, by the way, with the latest 2021 results combining for an 899-point total out of 1,000 possible points. The brand’s retail dealerships ranked in either 1st or 2nd place in each of the survey’s five classifications, which included Service Facility, Service Advisor, Service Initiation, Service Quality, and Vehicle Pick-Up.

2021 Porsche Panamera
If you’re looking for a very fast luxury sport sedan, the Panamera should be on your list.

Porsche’s current lineup consists of six models, or seven if one chooses to divide the 718 Cayman and 718 Boxster body styles individually, with the other five including the legendary 911, the just-noted entry-level Macan compact luxury crossover, the mid-size Cayenne luxury SUV, the Panamera four-door coupe/sport sedan, and finally the new Taycan EV four-door coupe/sport sedan electric.

2022 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
The Taycan EV, shown here in its elongated Cross Turismo body style, is a strong competitor to Tesla’s Model S.

Following any of the linked models to our Canada Prices pages shows that Porsche is currently offering each model with leasing and financing rates from zero percent, so check out each links to remind yourself what they look like, figure out trim and pricing details, plus configure the one you’re interested in with colours and options. Also, be sure to see how your CarCostCanada membership helps you access dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when you’re negotiating your next deal, plus remember to download our free app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store, so you’ll have all of this important info when you need it most.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche releases updates and pricing on 2022 model year 911

2022 Porsche 911 Carrera
Porsche’s base Carrera coupe starts at $115,000 for 2022, with the Cabriolet (shown) available from $129,600.

It might only be April, but 2022 Porsche 911s are already available to configure and order on Porsche’s retail website.

It all started with the recent introduction of the fabulous new 502-horsepower 911 GT3, which starts at $180,300 and will be delivered this fall, while now all 2022 911 body styles and trims are showing on Porsche Canada’s retail website, with pricing for the base model moving up from $113,000 for the current model year to $115,000 for the next model year’s cars.

The $2,000 price hike is reasonable, being that the German luxury brand will add standard comfort and communications features across the entire 911 line, starting with an updated Porsche Communication Management (PCM) touchscreen measuring 10.9 inches across. It features a simplified interface inspired by the one in the new Taycan EV, which integrates entertainment, navigation, comfort and communications systems into one flexible layout that boasts plenty of personalization options.

2022 Porsche_911 Carrera S
Porsche added a new Carrera S trim to the 911 range for 2021, which starts at $133,100 for 2022.

Additionally, the PCM update includes a trial period extension for the brand’s connected services package, growing to 36 months from just 12. After the three-year initiation period is over, connected services can be had via subscription.

Porsche Connect, that comes as part of the just-noted connected services package, now includes Voice Pilot that responds to natural language prompts available when saying, “Hey Porsche.”

The Navigation Plus system now features real-time traffic information too, plus online map updates and a calendar, as well as Radio Plus.

2022 Porsche 911 Targa 4S
The 911 Targa, which offers a four-seasons coupe and retractable hardtop body style, can be had from $138,000.

Slow to the party, the new 911 is the first Porsche to include standard Android Auto, which should be appreciated by the bulk of consumers who use Android-powered smartphones. PCM has long included Apple CarPlay, and will continue to do so via wireless and wired connectivity.

Music lovers can rejoice too, not to mention talk radio fans, because a SiriusXM satellite radio (with 360L) three-month trial subscription is now standard.

What’s more, just as with the Taycan, all 2022 911 models can accept direct integration of Apple Music and Apple Podcasts after purchasing an Apple service subscription.

2022 Porsche 911 Turbo
Porsche’s 2022 911 Turbo starts at $198,400.

As for mechanical technologies, dual-clutch PDK transmission-equipped 911 Carrera, Targa, and Turbo models are now upgradable with Remote ParkAssist, which lets the driver remotely move the car in and out of a parking space with their smartphone when standing outside.

Additionally, Remote ParkAssist comes bundled with Active Parking Support, controlled via the new PCM. A 3D Surround View parking camera is now optional too, as is Rear Cross Traffic Alert with Lane Change Assist.

After the $115,000 base 911 Carrera, the identical coupe body style can be further upgraded to the all-wheel drive-equipped Carrera 4 from $123,400, or buyers can opt for a Carrera S at $133,100, or Carrera 4S at $141,500.

2022 Porsche 911 Turbo S
The top-tier Turbo S can be had as a Cabriolet for $250,200.

The enhanced 911 Carrera Cabriolet begins at $129,600 for 2022, while chopping the roof off with AWD results in a $138,000 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. Additionally, the 2022 Carrera S Cabriolet now starts at $147,700, while the Carrera 4S Cabriolet can be had from $156,100.

If you want the best of both worlds, the 911 Targa 4 is now available from $138,000, while the Targa 4S starts at $156,100. Once again, three 911 Turbo models are available for the coming model year, starting at $198,400 for the Turbo, and then moving up to $213,000 for the Turbo Cabriolet, plus finally $235,600 for the Turbo S and $250,200 for the Turbo S Cabriolet.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
The all-new GT3 is the star of the 911 lineup for 2022, starting at $180,300.

Last but hardly least, the model Porsche says is “the most focused and agile ‘992’ generation car yet” is only available in a single trim line, but we’re not complaining, as the new 2022 911 GT3 is reportedly as good as sports cars get for just $180,300. So far, no 911 GT2 model has been announced, so we’ll obviously need to come back to cover all this again when the brand’s (current) ultimate super coupe arrives on the scene.

So far, we haven’t updated our 911 coverage to include a 2022 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page (expect one soon), so for the time being check out our 2021 Porsche 911 Canada Prices page that’s showing a factory leasing and financing rate of zero percent, plus average member savings of $2,800.

Make sure to find out how CarCostCanada can save you thousands off your next new vehicle purchase by informing you about the latest factory leasing and financing deals, manufacturer rebates, and dealer invoice pricing that can help you negotiate your best deal. Also, remember to download the free CarCostCanada app from the Google Play Store or Apple Store, so you can have all of this critical info available to you at the dealership, when you need it most of all.

All 2022 Porsche 911 trims are available to order now, with deliveries expected this coming fall.

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche shows that its new Taycan EV can be as practical as it’s fast

2021 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
The new Cross Turismo body style adds significantly more cargo space to the Taycan line.

As anyone who’s spent days at a time driving around in a mid-engine supercar will tell you, there’s more to a car than just being able to go fast. Hence the new age of four-door coupes, Porsche’s fully electric Taycan EV being the latest of such wonders to hit the road. Now, just as it did with its more conventionally-powered Panamera four-door coupe’s transition into the Sport Turismo, Porsche is introducing an extended sport wagon version of the Taycan to expand its practicality without detracting from its performance-oriented nature.

The new Taycan Cross Turismo is Porsche’s answer to Audi’s E-tron (or the new E-Tron Sportback), Jaguar’s I-Pace, and Tesla’s Model X, for the time being at least. No doubt, the Stuttgart-based firm will eventually reveal a purely electric SUV, but for now EV fans with more pragmatic leanings will need to settle for an elongated four-door coupe, not that opting for a Taycan Cross Turismo could ever be considered hardship.

2021 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
It might look like a regular Taycan from up front…

By the numbers, the new Cross Turismo provides 793 litres (28.0 cu ft) of added cargo space for a new maximum of 1,200 litres (42.4 cu ft), which is a great leap forward from the regular Taycan’s 407-litre (14.4 cu-ft) trunk. This doesn’t include the Taycan’s 81-litre (2.8 cu-ft) “frunk” (front trunk) either, which is standard in both cars. If you still require more luggage capacity, Porsche has a bespoke roof-top cargo carrier on offer that’s capable of clinging in place up to 200 km/h.

2021 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
…. but the Cross Tusismo can haul a lot more than the regular four-door coupe.

Yes, the Cross Turismo is no different than the regular Taycan coupe when it comes to performance, with top track speeds varying from 220 to 250 km/h depending on trim. Both body styles feature identical 800-volt battery-electric plug-in power units, complete with a lithium-ion Performance Battery Plus good for 93.4 kWh of power, which makes the car capable of approximately 320 km of range before a recharge, depending on exterior temperatures conditions, road conditions, driving style, etcetera.

Especially helpful, up to 100 km of range is available after a mere five minutes of being hooked up to a DC fast charger, which should be enough for most people to top up and get on their way. Of course, if plugged into a regular 240-volt charging station it will take significantly more time to reach that level of range.

2021 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
Just five minutes on a DC fast charger can provide up to 100 km/h of range.

Charging times will also be reflective of the chosen Taycan model, as will the Cross Turismo’s zero to 100 km/h performance. The slowpoke of the litter is the base Taycan 4 Cross Turismo, which nevertheless zips past the 100 km/h mark in a rapid 5.1 seconds due to its 375-hp dual-motor electric power unit. An upgrade to the 4S Cross Turismo will chop an entire second off that standstill to 100 km/h sprint time, thanks to 482 hp flowing through to all four of its wheels.

Porsche oddly uses its “Turbo” nameplate for top-level Taycan trims, but even if those around chuckle at the thought of a turbocharged EV, you’ll be last to laugh as you blast past. To that end, the Taycan Turbo Cross Turismo puts out a formidable 616 hp, resulting in just 3.3 seconds from naught to 100 km/h, whereas the even quicker Turbo S Cross Turismo provides 750 hp for an otherworldly 2.9-second run to 100 km/h, when launch control is employed.

2021 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
Porsche has plenty of lifestyle-enhancing accessories available to make life with a Taycan Cross Turismo better.

Porsche provides all Taycan Cross Turismo models with the same chassis and adaptive suspension system, which is shared with the regular Taycan coupe, while all-wheel drive is standard to improve four-season capability. Better yet, Porsche includes a standard “Gravel Mode” too, this setting adjusting the model’s throttle response and chassis control to optimize adhesion to less than ideal road surfaces.

If you want even more off-road prowess, an optional Off-Road Design package raises the Cross Turismo’s ride height by 30 mm (1.2 in), plus provides more protection to paint surfaces that might otherwise get chipped without mud flaps. Additional rugged-looking upgrades give this EV more of a crossover look. s

2021 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
Standard all-wheel drive makes the Taycan Cross Turismo reasonable capable off-road.

Appearances in mind, the Cross Turismo is already tougher looking than a regular Taycan, thanks to SUV-style matte black body cladding circling the wheel cutouts, yet more along the rocker panels, and of course more rugged black stuff end-to-end, while the front and back bumper caps are further enhanced with stylish silver undertrays.

Deliveries of the new Taycan Cross Turismo will start this summer, so make sure to give your local Porsche retailer a call if you’d like to get your hands on one. Pricing begins at $119,900 for the entry-level Taycan Cross Turismo 4, and grows to $126,800 for the Taycan Cross Turismo 4S, $178,000 for the Taycan Cross Turismo Turbo, and lastly $218,000 for the top-tier Taycan Cross Turismo Turbo S.

2021 Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo
If you’re looking for a more practical EV, Porsche’s Taycan Cross Turismo might be the answer.

Notably, the Cross Turismo’s base power unit is not available in the regular Taycan coupe, which is why this crossover-wagon variant is a bit more affordable. Specifically, the 2021 Taycan 4S can be had for $120,500, but it incorporates the Cross Turismo’s stronger 4S power unit. Therefore, a direct price comparison should be made against the $126,800 Taycan Cross Turismo 4S, which requires $6,300 more than the four-door coupe variant. Even better, Cross Turismo Turbo and Turbo S trims only cost $3,000 more than their regular Taycan equivalents.

Our 2021 Porsche Taycan Canada Prices page makes these differences clear, plus it also lets you configure the current coupe model’s standard and optional features. Take note that Porsche is now offering the Taycan coupe with factory leasing and financing rates from zero percent, and remember that all CarCostCanada members have access to manufacturer rebate info (when available), and dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when negotiating your deal. Find out how your CarCostCanada membership can save you money on any new vehicle sold in Canada, and while you’re at it, make sure to download our free smartphone app so you can have everything you need to save big on your next new car, truck or SUV when you need it most.

The All-New Taycan Cross Turismo (1:29):

Taycan Cross Turismo: Digital World Premiere (17:40):

Taycan Cross Turismo – Inner Space (2:30):

The Camouflaged Taycan Cross Turismo Hits the Road (1:57):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Incredible 911 GT3 gets more power, improved handling and fabulous new styling

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
If you see this car approaching from behind, best to get out of the way unless you’re driving a 911 GT2.

Were you expecting a wallflower? The new 2022 GT3 won’t have any issues standing out in a crowd, albeit not as sensationally supercar-like as the now discontinued GT2 (don’t worry, a new one is on the way). Let’s just agree that no one will mistake it for a run-of-the-mill 911 Carrera.

Porsche recently revealed the latest version of what many Porsche purists deem the ultimate 911, and of course the updated model has been getting its fair share of attention. When peering at it from your rearview mirror, a new dual vented carbon-fibre hood lets you know to move over and give it room to get by, at which point you’ll almost immediately get a glimpse of the new model’s massive swan-neck carbon-fibre rear wing and CFRP diffuser. In their default settings, the GT3’s aerodynamic add-ons improve downforce by 50 percent over a regular 911 coupe, but with a few adjustments you can get up to 150 percent more downforce when running at 200 km/h.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
There’s nothing subtle about the new GT3’s rear wing, but like everything with Porsche it serves a purpose.

All of that speed comes via the same 4.0-litre horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine as the previous model, albeit making 10 ponies more for a considerable 502 horsepower, whereas its 346 lb-ft of torque remains unchanged. Possibly the best part of the GT3 story is that all that power comes without a turbocharger, making this model the only naturally aspirated 911 available.

Instead, size matters more, the GT3’s flat-six a full litre larger than the twin-turbo Carrera’s boxer, while some pretty fancy tech goes along for the ride, including six throttle butterflies for that just-noted 10-horsepower bump, plus an ultra-lofty rev limit of 9,000 rpm. That’s out of this world for a flat engine configuration, by the way, this layout normally strongest at the low end, but not designed for whirring away at stratospheric levels.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
The GT3’s aerodynamics benefit high-speed stability.

What’s more, the engine’s natural aspiration isn’t the GT3’s only unique differentiator amongst 911 models. Even more noticeable when driving is the manual model’s six-speed gearbox, compared to the majority of 911s that sport a seven-speed manual. Just like with all 911s, GT3 owners can opt for a seven-speed dual-clutch automated PDK gearbox with paddles, but it won’t cost you a penny more. Also relevant, the GT3’s PDK isn’t specifically related to new version introduced for all other (992 series) 911s, but instead comes from the old 2019 GT3, the reasoning behind its use being an 18-kilo drop in mass and extremely fast input response.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
Porsche claims the new GT3’s handling is noticeably improved.

The six-speed manual isn’t new either, but gets shared with the fabulous 718 Spyder and 718 Cayman GT4. This gearbox is lightweight, features rev-matching to make non-pro drivers sound like the real deal, and is commonly praised for its smooth actuation. The six-speed manual is in fact so good that 68.7 percent of past Canadian GT3 buyers chose it over the PDK. This probably says more for the types of performance enthusiasts that choose the GT3 over other 911 models too, that person more appreciative of the art of driving over ease of use and/or sheer straight-line performance. As is always the case, the PDK is faster off the line than the manual, the GT3 with the autobox requiring a mere 3.4 seconds from zero to 100 km/h, with 200 km/h needing just 10.8 seconds.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
If blue isn’t you thing, don’t worry because Porsche provides a vast array of colour choices.

No matter the transmission choice, the GT3 comes standard with a wholly new double-wishbone front suspension design. The new front suspension was developed by Porsche’s sports car racing team for the Le Mans-winning 911 RSR, with the GT3 being its first application in a 911 production car. It allows for a more rigid spring setup with more camber stiffness, which better isolates the shocks from transverse forces that could otherwise upset forward momentum amid shifting mass. Overall, Porsche promises better handling.

Also upgraded, the GT3’s five-arm rear suspension now includes additional ball joints for the lower wishbones, plus spherical bushings and unique dampers. Porsche says it makes the new GT3 is a better track car, but this should also translate into a better daily driver, whether your commute is urban or on a curving rural road.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
How about a black GT3? No doubt it’s just as fast.

Additionally, the more responsive suspension setup comes mated to standard rear-wheel steering that make them rotate up to two degrees in the same or opposite direction, depending on whether the objective is high-speed stability or easing low-speed parking manoeuvres.

To scrub off speed from the former, the outgoing GT3’s already sizeable 380 mm front brake discs grow to 408 mm too, while weighing a significant 17-percent less. As for doing better with low-speed situations, such as rolling over big speed bumps or climbing steep driveways, Porsche has included a front axle lift system to keep the gorgeous carbon fibre front lip spoiler from dragging on the pavement.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
GT3 upgrades include a new carbon fibre lip spoiler, hood, fenders, rear wing, and optionally a CFRP roof.

That lip spoiler, as well as the new hood, the massive wing and the rear spoiler already mentioned, are not the only exterior features produced from carbon fibre reinforced plastic, incidentally. Yet more CFRP body panels include the rear fenders and, optionally, the roof.

“Road-approved circuit rubber” is also available, while GT3 buyers can add a rear roll cage too, by opting for the Clubsport package (not available in all markets). The all-new battery requires no extra investment, however. It hits the scales after a 10-kilo diet compared to the one used in the old GT3, with all of the new model’s weight-saving improvements and increased engine performance adding up to a superb 2.8 kg/PS power-to-weight ratio.

2022 Porsche 911 GT3
The standard Alcantara-covered sport seats should keep driver and passenger in place during hard cornering.

Deleting the rear wing can eliminate even more weight, but I can’t see this being a popular choice unless planning to install an even larger one. Still, it’s possible more conservative buyers find it a bit much for everyday driving, so Porsche has provided the option to trade it for the regular 911’s power-adjustable spoiler via a Touring package.

As for GT3 interior upgrades, they continue to include plenty of Alcantara psuede on the steering wheel rim, sport seats, and elsewhere, plus Porsche’s usual “GT3” branding.

The new 2022 GT3 is now available to order, with first deliveries expected in the fall of this year.

The new 911 GT3: Time is Precious (2:35):

The New 911 GT3 at the Nürburgring (1:33):

The New 911 GT3: Onboard at the Nordschleife (7:33):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Porsche 718 Boxster 25 Years marks quarter century of availability

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster 25 Years
The new 2021 Porsche 718 Boxster 25 Years combines many of the elements of the original Boxster prototype with the thoroughly modern 718.

Porsche’s Boxster is arguably the most successful new sports car to arrive on the scene in the past 25 years. It debuted in concept form at the 1993 North American International Auto Show to much fanfare, and was followed up in production trim for the 1997 model year. The rest, as they say, is history.

To mark its silver anniversary, Porsche is offering a 718 Boxster 25 Years edition for 2021 in (you guessed it) silver, but the classic colour wasn’t only chosen to represent its quarter century celebration. In fact, the original show car actually wore the same hue, as well as a similar red interior treatment. It should be noted that black and white exterior paint are also available, while gold trim complements the front fascia, side engine vents, and “25” year badge added to the rear bumper next to the usual “Boxster” script.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster 25 Years
Those who like classic retrospective designs, should love the new 718 Boxster 25 years.

Such details are similar to the original prototype, with Porsche even painting the alloy wheels in the special gold tone. Sadly, the racing-style aluminum gas cap is hidden from view under a cover, instead of being fully exposed like on the original concept.

At least the new commemorative car’s power-retractable cloth roof is dyed in red like the original show model. Embosses on each front outside section is the “Boxster 25” script that also shows when the top is lowered, at which point its red interior adds to the classic look. The leather seats are red, of course, as are the door panels, with Porsche even going so far as to finish off the cabin with red carpets and floor mats that feature the “Boxster 25” insignia. Additionally, a “Boxster 25” plaque gets added to the instrument panel ahead of the front passenger, featuring 0000/1250 numbering.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster 25 Years
The limited edition model’s red fabric roof really sets it apart.

Below the classic looking skin is Porsche’s ultra-advanced 718 Boxster GTS 4.0, which means that it’s powered by a 911 GT3-honed naturally-aspirated 4.0-litre six-cylinder capable of 394 horsepower and 309 lb-ft of torque when conjoined to its standard six-speed manual gearbox, or 317 lb-ft of twist when fitted to the optional seven-speed double-clutch PDK.

Sport Chrono Package enhanced, the paddle-shift prompted model can accelerate from zero to 100 km/h in just 4.0 seconds, whereas the manually geared car will need another half-second to complete the task. Similarly, the 718 Boxster manual blasts from zero to 160 km/h in 9.2 seconds, while the optional PDK variant can manage the feat in 8.7 seconds, all before topping out at 293 and 288 km/h respectively.

2021 Porsche 718 Boxster 25 Years
The 718 Boxster 25 Years’ interior is almost entirely finished in red.

While the new 718 Boxster 25 Years edition might seem as if it’s too good to be true, there is one negative in that Porsche has limited production to just 1,250 examples. For this reason, you shouldn’t expect to get a discount, if you can find one at all. You may be able to qualify for zero-percent financing, however, which Porsche is currently offering on all models including the 718 Boxster and its 718 Spyder variant. Check out our 2021 Porsche 718 Boxster Canada Prices page for more info, and remember to download the free CarCostCanada app so you can access dealer invoice pricing and all of our other money saving info whenever you need it.

The new 2021 718 Boxster 25 Years is available from $106,500 plus freight and fees, while the base 718 Boxster starts at just $68,800.

Boxster 25 Years: Walkaround (6:29):

Boxster 25 Years: Forever Young (1:37):

The Boxster at 25: An Homage to its Inception (4:59):

Boxster 25 Years: Boundless Driving Freedom (1:27):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

Panamera Turbo S achieves record 1:31.51-minute lap time at Road Atlanta

2021 Porsche Panamera Turbo S
Porsche’s Panamera Turbo S looks menacing on Road Atlanta, and it should now that it holds the track record for production sedans.

What’s the fastest sedan in the world? Numerous four-door competitors have made claims of being quickest off the line, achieving the highest top track speed, and providing the best handling characteristics, but there’s a very good argument for the Porsche Panamera Turbo S being the current title holder.

Back in July of last year, an even less powerful Panamera Turbo achieved the Nürburgring Nordschleife lap record for production executive cars with Porsche works driver Leh Keen at the wheel, a title it continues to hold today, while Keen also piloted the even more capable Panamera Turbo S to the top spot amongst production sedans at the challenging 4.0-km long Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta road course with a lap time of 1:31.51 minutes.

2021 Porsche Panamera Turbo S
Road Atlanta is a challenging 4.0-km long road course.

“The engineers found a perfect balance,” commented Keen after his record lap. “They really made it feel small and sporty. The stability gave me a ton of confidence to use every bit of the asphalt and curbs. And yet the car has a completely different and more refined and relaxed character on the highway – an amazing combination.”

Factor in the Panamera is a luxury sedan made from some of the finest materials available, and filled with top-tier premium features (which add a lot of weight), and its highly competitive time seems even more daunting. The only cars that have officially beaten the Panamera Turbo S’ lap time include two Chevy Corvette Z06 (C7) entries with times of 1:30.18 and 1:29.81, a Dodge Viper ACR (Mk V) that ran Atlanta at 1:26.54, a Corvette ZR1 that did it in 1:26.45, and three Porsche 911s that hold third, second and first, including a GT3 RS at 1:26.24 and two GT2 RS (991) entries, the best of which achieved a time of 1:24.88. This puts the Panamera Turbo S in seventh place overall.

2021 Porsche Panamera Turbo S
The less powerful Panamera Turbo currently holds the production sedan record at Germany’s famed Nürburgring Nordschleife too.

This also means the big four-door Porsche outpaced its own Cayman GT4 (718), which ran the track in 1:32.24 with the same driver at the wheel, not to mention the Taycan Turbo S that Keen drove to 1:33.88 (and earned a best lap time for EVs).

The Panamera Turbo S is new for 2021, as is its 620-horsepower twin-turbo 4.0-litre V8 engine. It puts 604 lb-ft of torque down to all four wheels, resulting in a mind-blowing zero to 100km/h sprint time of only 3.1 seconds, and an amazingly fast top track speed of 315 km/h (196 mph).

2021 Porsche Panamera Turbo S
Porsche works driver Leh Keen piloted the Panamera Turbo S to its lap record.

Along with all of the luxurious refinement and high-tech features that come with a car of the Panamera’s calibre, the new Turbo S comes standard with a host of advanced performance features too, including Porsche Ceramic Composite Brakes (PCCB), Porsche Torque Vectoring Plus (PTV+), rear axle steering, and Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control Sport roll-stabilization system (PDCC Sport).

The only change from production spec during its record setting Road Atlanta run, was the allowed upgrade from stock performance rubber to newly-developed road-legal Michelin Pilot Sport cup 2 ND0 ultra-high-performance tires that measure 275/35 ZR 21 103Y XL up front and 325/30 ZR 21 108Y XL at the rear. The “N” designation means these Michelins were co-developed with Porsche, with this special tire specifically designed for the Panamera and tuned at the aforementioned Nürburgring Nordschleife race track.

2021 Porsche Panamera Turbo S
Porsche’s team of motorsport professionals takes track performance very seriously, which is why the brand’s cars drive so well on the road too.

It should be noted that vehicle data acquisition and timing expert Racelogic recorded and verified the Panamera Turbo S’ Road Atlanta lap time using their VBOX video HD2 system. They’d better keep that timing equipment ready, because something tells us Porsche’s Panamera Turbo S will be setting more lap records in the near future.

To find out more about Porsche’s flagship sport sedan as well as its even more practical extended Sport Turismo variant, check out our 2021 Porsche Panamera Canada Prices page that shows all retail pricing and allows you to build out each trim with all available features.

Even better, a CarCostCanada membership will provide you with dealer invoice pricing that could save you thousands when it comes time to negotiate, not to mention other savings from manufacturer rebates when available, to factory leasing and financing rates that are currently set to zero percent. The CarCostCanada app will make sure you have all of this valuable info at your fingertips when you need it most, so be sure to download it for free at the Apple Store or Google Play Store.

Porsche Panamera Turbo S: Road Atlanta Record Lap (2:12):

Panamera Turbo S Record Lap: Driver’s POV (1:50):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche

CarCostCanada

From wild to wacky: Porsche reveals 15 “Unseen” concepts

2016 Porsche Le Mans Living Legend
We think that some of Porsche’s previously “Unseen” concepts should be built, with the Le Mans Living Legend at the top of the list.

Those fortunate enough to have attended a major auto show (remember those?) will know that some of the most exciting new reveals are concept cars and prototypes, yet for some reason Porsche has hidden away most of its non-production gems, until now that is.

As part of a new “Porsche Unseen” project that includes a hard cover book and website, Porsche dusted off 15 of its previously hidden concepts, showing some that were clearly inspired by the brand’s motorsport success and others that influenced today’s production models. There’s a number of gorgeous modernized historical recreations too, not to mention others that pay tribute to the brand’s previous rally racing triumphs. All were organized into four appropriately named categories, including Hypercars, Little Rebels, Spin Offs, and What’s Next? So without further ado let’s delve into each one in order to see all that Porsche has been hiding from us over the past decade-and-a-half.

Hypercars: Will any of these concepts influence Porsche’s next supercar?

2013 Porsche 917 Living Legend
Porsche made more hypercar concepts than any other.

The Hypercars category is by far the largest, incorporating six concepts that’ll easily get your head spinning. The first arrived in 2013 and the most recent was created in 2019, with the result being six glorious years of would-be supercars. Before we start complaining about none in this six-pack getting the green light for production, we should remember the brilliant 918 Spyder that was actually being produced during much of this era. Still, how we’d love to see production runs of some of these others. At the very least, these concepts will inspire future designs, which might have to be good enough.

2013 Porsche 917 Living Legend: Gorgeous race car for the street

2013 Porsche 917 Living Legend
You might have seen this 2013 Porsche 917 Living Legend before, and it looks just as stunning today.

We covered the stunning 917 Living Legend at length previously in these pages, as it was the only car from this collection to see daylight thanks to Porsche’s 50th anniversary “Colours of Speed” exhibition that took place at the brand’s museum in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany in 2013. If the name didn’t give it away, its modernized take on the legendary 917 KH race car makes its heritage known immediately.

The famed model was responsible for Porsche’s first Le Mans win (that now total 19) in 1970, so it’s only appropriate that the concept wears a revised version of the original’s Salzburg red-and-white paint scheme. The 1:1 industrial plasticine model fittingly marked Porsche’s return to the top-level LMP1 class of FIA-sanctioned sports car racing.

2015 Porsche 906 Living Legend: Once again pulling inspiration from motorsport

2005 Porsche 906 Living Legend
A racer for the street or track? The 2005 906 Living Legend follows a motorsport theme that dominates Porsche’s concepts.

Following a motorsport theme, the 906 Living Legend was heavily inspired by Porsche’s 906 race car that took part in the 1966 Targa Florio road race. Specifically, the 906 Living Legend’s front lighting elements can be seen in the cooling ducts, not unlike those on the original, while its red and white livery references the classic racer too.

“The design process for such visions is very free,” stated Porsche’s Chief Designer, Michael Mauer. “It is not necessary to keep to pre-defined product identity characteristics. For example, the headlights were positioned in an air intake as a futuristic light source. When we were later developing an identity for our electric models, we took another look at these designs. The radical idea of simply integrating a light source in an opening instead of a glass cover seemed appropriate for us. We are now approaching this ideal.” Additionally, Mauer said, “Modern hypercars are greatly dependent on their aerodynamics and openings resulting from the enormous ventilation requirements.”

2017 Porsche 919 Street: From racetrack to perceived public roads with little modification

2017 Porsche 919 Street Concept
If the 2017 Porsche 919 Street Concept looks like an LMP race car, it’s no coincidence.

The 919 Street, created in 2017, is in fact a road-going 919 Hybrid LMP1 race car, in 1:1 clay model form at least. The track-only 919 Hybrid, which laid waste to all LMP1 sports car challengers, achieving four consecutive FIA World Endurance Championships from 2014 to 2017, was an ideal starting point for any road-going hypercar.

Therefore, Porsche kept the basic design of the race car’s bodywork and underpinnings intact, including its carbon-fibre monocoque and 900 PS hybrid drivetrain, not to mention its overall dimensions including its track and wheelbase, which are identical. It’s hard to imagine why Porsche didn’t build this beast, as every example would’ve been snapped up by collectors in minutes.

2019 Porsche Vision 918 RS: This one owes its existence to the 918 Spyder supercar

2019 Porsche Vision 918 RS
The 918 RS might depict a future Porsche hypercar.

Porsche was seriously considering producing the 918 RS, however, having moved the concept along all the way to the development stage. As you may have guessed (or read in the title), this 1:1 hard model rides on the backbone of Porsche’s hybrid-powered 918 Spyder, but unlike the ultra-fast roadster this one wears a permanent roof.

The fixed head coupe profile wasn’t the only original bit of bodywork either, with as plenty of other upgrades were made to give the 918 RS its own unique look. Is this the future of Porsche hypercars? Being one of the most recent, we think it provides a hint of what the Stuttgart brand has in store.

2019 Porsche Vision 920: A future LMP1 car?

2019 Porsche Vision 920
Don’t expect to see the Vision 920 on the street, but we may catch a glimpse of something similar on the track.

The Vision 920 is more about looking into the future than the past. Hopefully it’s imagining something track-ready for Porsche’s next foray into sports car racing, as the car looks armed and ready for FIA LMP (Le Mans Prototype) sanctioned events. In true dedicated race car fashion, the solo driver occupies the centre position behind a wraparound jet-fighter like windshield.

Likewise, all the aerodynamic ducting and exposed suspension hardware make this motorsport concept appear like a future series champion, so let’s hope they build it and head back to Le Mans.

2019 Porsche Vision E: Is this Porsche’s future? 

2019 Porsche Vision E
Another track star, the Vision E combines the best from Porsche’s Formula E car with year-round usability.

Porsche left sports car prototype racing to focus on the all-electric Formula E series, which is probably why the Vision E concept exists. It’s powered by an 800-volt, fully-electric power unit, although unlike Formula E cars this more road-worthy alternative is fully-enclosed to had its single occupant from the elements.

Tiny motorcycle-like fenders make it kind of legal, theoretically, although being that it was just a 1:1 hard model we’ll never know. Porsche did move it all the way up to the development stage, mind you, but so far nothing similar has shown up in any future model section of the German brand’s website.

Little Rebels: These are the little cuties we know you want most

Few brands pay greater tribute to past triumphs than Porsche, but then again, few brands have such storied pasts to draw upon. The Little Rebels category pulls design elements from a few Porschephile favourites, so make sure to let us know which one you’d like to have in your driveway.

2013 Porsche 904 Living Legend: Autocross star in the making

2013 Porsche 904 Living Legend
Porsche was on a roll in 2013, and this 904 Living Legend is a clear example of concepts done right.

Can we get a vote? Is the 904 Living Legend your favourite so far? It certainly ranks high on our list of cars we’d love to see Porsche build, even if it’s already eight years old. Interestingly, this retrospective sports car was actually based on the VW XL1 streamliner, a fuel-economy-focused diesel-powered (are we allowed to mention that word anymore?) prototype.

Porsche dug into a different VW group brand to source the 904 Living Legend’s engine, however, resulting in a high-revving Ducati V2 motorcycle engine that no doubt has little problem moving this 900-kilgram two-seater like a rocket.

While our fingers are crossed something similar gets created with Porsche’s fabulous turbocharged four-cylinder stuffed into the engine compartment, resulting in a German interpretation of Lotus’ Elise, or more accurately a modernized version of the late great 1963 Porsche Carrera GTS (it’s inspiration after all), we’re not ponying up down payments just yet.

2016 Porsche Vision 916: Beautiful, fast and clean 

2016 Porsche Vision 916
The Vision 916 is 100 percent electric and gorgeous.

The Vision 916 might look like supercar, but in reality, the sleek two-seat coupe is a lot more down to earth. In fact, the Vision 916 features a 100-percent electric battery and hub-motor drivetrain, combining for blisteringly quick acceleration and zero emissions.

Porsche says it was inspired by a six-cylinder-powered version of the ‘70s-era 914, dubbed 916, which was never produced for mass consumption, but we can’t see much of a resemblance to the squared off mid-engine model.

2019 Porsche Vision Spyder: Boxster of tomorrow?

2019 Porsche Vision Spyder
We’d be happy if Porsche pushed 718 Boxster styling in the direction of this Vision Spyder concept.

The more rectangular Vision Spyder, on the other hand, has 914 written all over it, and we’re hoping it influences the next 718 Boxster. Yes, Porsche’s entry-level roadster still looks great, but every model needs updates, and pushing 718 series design in the Vision Spyder’s direction certainly wouldn’t hurt.

The 1:1 hard model receives a classic silver, red and black motorsport livery that would cause any Porschephile to be hopeful for a potential spec racing series, or at least provide some happy thoughts about future weekends at a local autocross course.

Just like today’s 718 series, this Vision Spyder receives its ideal handling balance from a mid-engine layout, while some styling highlights can be traced back to the 1954 550-1500 RS Spyder. As noted, we’re also eyeing some 1969-1976 914 in this design, particularly in its angular elements and fabulous looking roll hoop.

Spin-Offs: These ones are closer to reality

When you think of spin-offs, what comes to mind? Normally the term conjures up the next Star Wars prequel or sequel, or perhaps another Marvel comic strip coming to life. In Porsche-speak, however, it’s all about modifying an existing model to the nth degree, so that its purpose becomes expanded beyond its original scope.

2012 Porsche 911 Vision Safari: The ultimate rally car?

2012 Porsche 911 Vision Safari
Which Porsche enthusiast wouldn’t want a 911 like the Vision Safari? Bring it on!

Those who’ve loved Porsche for multiple decades may remember the phenomenal 959, which when after debuting in 1986 became the fastest production car in the world. Being four-wheel drive, Porsche went about raising and beefing up its suspension in order to take the car rallying, which resulted in immediate first, second and sixth place finishes in the 1986 Paris-Dakar rally—7,500 of the most grueling miles any car could endure.

Seeing something similar based on the even more attractive 991 body style is even better, especially when factoring in that it probably wouldn’t set its buyer back anywhere near the $6 million USD needed to pick up a race-experienced 959.

Of course, this one-off concept would be worth a fair penny if Porsche decided to sell it, but that’s not likely to happen. Instead, they might want to combine an updated version based on the latest 911 Turbo with a spec off-road series. Hey, we can hope.

2013 Macan Vision Safari: Porsche should build this awesome 4×4

2013 Porsche Macan Vision Safari
Update its styling to the gen-two design, and a production Macan Vision Safari is a no-brainer.

While an off-road capable 911 sounds awesome, a 4×4-ready Macan makes more sense from a sales perspective. If that sounds too farfetched to contemplate, stretch your mind back to when the original Cayenne arrived. It was actually quite handy off-road, so we know Porsche isn’t against getting dirty when it needs to.

Despite being based on the first-generation Macan, this Vision Safari concept shows just how amazing a muscled-up version of Porsche’s entry-level SUV could be. Look a little closer and you might notice that this 1:1 scale hard model isn’t only about big tires and bulky body-cladding, it’s also been transformed into a two-door coupe. We’d like it with four doors too, so hurry up and build it, Porsche.

2014 Porsche Boxster Bergspyder: the perfect mid-engine track star

2014 Porsche Boxster Bergspyder
The perfect track star, Porsche’s 2014 Boxster Bergspyder would be ideal for a spec series.

Back on tarmac, Porsche’s 2014 Boxster Bergspyder would be better suited to smooth surfaces than anything unpaved. Based on Porsche’s lightweight roadster, with yet more mass removed via a barchetta-style permanently open roof, the elimination of the passenger seat (two’s a crowd anyway), and substitution of critical components with lighter weight composites, the Bergspyder has track star written all over it.

Additional updates include 911 Speedster-like shorten windscreen pillars along with cool dual roll hoops ahead of a Carrera GT-style double-bubble rear deck lid for a truly exotic look. The cabin’s primary gauge cluster comes straight out of a 918 Spyder, while a useful helmet shelf sits where the passenger would have previously.

If you thought dropping the Boxster’s weight down to a featherlight 1,130-kilos was good news, the inclusion of the Cayman GT4’s high-revving 3.8-litre flat-six is pure icing on the cake.

2016 Porsche Le Mans Living Legend: this is the one we want the most

2016 Porsche Le Mans Living Legend
How can they not built it? We think the Le Mans Living Legend is fabulous in every way.

The Le Mans Living Legend is a Boxster/Cayman-based sports coupe that pulls memories from the ‘50s. Inspired by the stunning 1953 550 Le Mans racing coupe, this one-off boasts a mid-mounted V8 with “excessive sound development,” or so says Porsche. It’s mated to a manual transmission, which is surprising yet ideal, and without doubt would clean up on any competitors that would dare to race it.

The divided rear window is a design element we’d love to see somewhere in Porsche’s future lineup, not to mention the classic exposed fuel cap mounted smack dab in the centre of the hood. Beautiful is an understatement, so let’s hope Porsche has plans to build it.

What’s Next? One that’s already here and another only displaying technology

The Vision Renndienst (Race Service) and Vision Turismo are the only two concepts that fall under the “What’s Next?” menu, but don’t let the name of this category make you think we’re about to be inundated with little electric delivery vans wearing Porsche badging.

2018 Porsche Vision Renndienst: It’s what’s underneath the skin that matters

2018 Porsche Vision Renndienst
Porsche should build the Vision Renndienst, but with a VW badge.

A Porsche minivan? While this cute little runabout wears Porsche’s famed crest up front (albeit a faded grey version with a transparent background), the Vision Renndienst is more about the all-electric skateboard platform design it sits upon.

Styled after the race service vans used in early racing programs, the Vision Renndienst has accommodations for six occupants, with the driver up front in the middle, either facing forward or rearward for relaxing while being driven autonomously.

A neat concept that would probably be better accepted with a big VW badge on the front panel, the Vision Renndienst nevertheless points the brand toward an electric future, a common theme these days.

2016 Vision 960 Turismo: Meet the Taycan’s early prototype

2016 Porsche Vision 960 Turismo
The 2016 Vision 960 Turismo was a technological predecessor to the Taycan EV.

The Vision 960 Turismo is an all-electric four-door coupe, looking for all purposes like a 918 Spyder supercar in front and a Panamera in the rear. The 1:1 scale model looks fabulous, although so does the Taycan in a much more modern way, so therefore it appears Porsche made the right decision to look forward with its first electric, rather than backward.

The 15 “Unseen” Porsche prototypes are currently on display at Porsche’s museum in Stuttgart, while a 328-page “Porsche Unseen” hardcover book that includes photos from Stefan Bogner with accompanying text by Jan Karl Baedeker, can be purchased in the Museum gift shop. It’s published by Delius Klasing Verlag and made available at Elferspot.com (ISBN number 978-3-667-11980-3) too.

As for now, sit back, relax and enjoy the “Porsche Unseen: Uncovered” video below that follows.

Porsche Unseen: Uncovered (47:52):

Story credits: Trevor Hofmann

Photo credits: Porsche